The Top Three Ways to Use Transcription in your Business

Many businesses are adopting transcription to streamline administrative tasks, freeing up valuable time to focus on business goals and projects.

Here are our top three ways transcription can be beneficial and save time and money:

  1. Record ideas and project goals – All successful projects start with a great idea, and a set of tasks that need to be completed. With the help of transcription you can record the ideas, discussions and tasks highlighted without the need for someone to write or minute the meeting. It also ensures that nothing is missed, which inevitably happens when jotting it down in a note pad.
  2. Record meetings and interviews – These are an essential part of business life, but anyone who has taken minutes a meeting will know that it is a tedious task. By recording the meetings or interviews you will ensure that everything is captured and that what was discussed flows naturally. It also ensures that all participants in the meeting are focused solely on what is being discussed rather than worrying about taking notes, making them more productive.
  3. Capture your events and conferences – Networking events and conferences play an important part in business growth. These types of events allow you and your customers (exiting and prospect) to get to know each other better. But what about those customers that were unable to make it, or were not invited, because you didn’t know they existed? If you record and then transcribe the content of your event into text and publish it online, they you are likely to engage with a wider audience and open your business to even more opportunities.

Fingertips typing offers an audio transcription service, for more information on our services and how we can help free up your businesses time and make it more productive then contact us: info@fingertipstyping.co.uk

Author: Cerri Killworth, Fingertips Typing Services

Transcribing Podcasts

The podcast has revolutionised the way we communicate content to the public, it has been perfect for; Schools, colleges, universities, businesses, the travel industry, not to mention more common forms of media such as: radio programmes, magazines, political broadcasts, religious organisations, TV commentary and newspapers.

However to be able to search for podcasts over the internet you need written content, search terms and keywords, otherwise your podcast is effectively invisible, unless you spend time and money advertising.

Providing a transcript of the full podcast or excerpts of it will help with getting good search engine results and ultimately drive more people to listen to your content. By providing a full transcript you also ensure that you do not alienate the deaf or those with slightly impaired hearing. If you can’t hear clearly, then your only option is to read. In fact the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 and the Communications Act 2003 encourages the provision of full accessible content for all broadcasts.

It is also quicker to read than listen to an audio file, you may find that some of your audience will prefer reading your podcast rather than listening.  By providing options you will not be limiting your audience.

Tips for transcribing podcasts:

  • Use Time Markers – Allow listeners to go to the point they want to hear, or they can read the transcript for that section
  • Transcribe in Intelligent Verbatim Transcription – This ensures a full, accurate transcript, removing all the ‘ums’, ‘ahs’, repetitions and other verbal habits people have. Making it easier to read and actually reduces transcription time and cost

How long does a Podcast take to transcribe?

The professional transcription industry standard allows one hour to transcribe 15 minutes of clearly recorded speech. It therefore takes a minimum of four hours to transcribe a one hour recording but this can be more depending on a number of factors including:

  • How clear the recording is
  • The clarity and speed of the voices
  • The number of people speaking
  • Background noise
  • Accents of speakers

The Benefits of Transcribing your Podcast

  • It allows you to create clickable links – Ensuring that you are always driving your listeners back to your website, which is always good etiquette
  • Reinforce the content – Some people like to have the written text in front of their eyes while listen
  • It is professional
  • Makes your content searchable – Which will drive more visitors to your site
  • Great for search engine optimization (SEO) – The transcribed files will allow you to create title, tags and description of the audio file which will be picked up by search engines whereas audio files do not currently have this ability

If you have a podcast and feel you would benefit from transcription services, then Fingertips Typing can help. Visit Fingertips Typing Services.

Written by: Cerri Killworth, Transcriber for Fingertips Typing Services.

Transcription and Police Interviews

History

It is believed that police cautions were first used in the early 1800s.[1]

By the 1920s, police began to give drivers  written warnings for motoring offences. The Home Office, in 1928, published statistics on cautions. [2]

From 1995 cautions were recorded on the Police National Computer (PNC), and it was recommended that cautions should be retained for 5 years, though each police force could follow its own guidelines. [1]

The Criminal Justice Act 2003 introduced the concept of statutory Conditional Cautions.[1]

In 2008 a Home Office circular made clear suspects must receive a written explanation of the implications before accepting a caution, to meet the informed consent obligation, and provided a new form to be signed by the offender which explained in considerable detail the consequences. [1]

TV/Movie Police Cautions

It’s a serious situation when an individual is being cautioned, as they are most likely getting arrested and charged with a crime.

However, the process is not always dramatic or exciting, so when TV series and movies are made, everything tends to be a bit more over the top

Remember these:

“Book’em, Danno” – Hawaii 5-0

“Get your trousers on – you’re nicked!” – The Sweeney

Do you remember any catchphrases of TV/movie cops? Let us know in the comments section below.

Police Caution in Interview

You do not have to say anything. But it may harm your defence, if you do not mention when questioned something which you later rely on in court. Anything you do say may be given in evidence.

This version of the police caution has been used from the inception of the Police and Criminal Evidence (PACE) Act 1984.

The caution prior to that was “you do not have to say anything unless you wish to do so, but what you say may be given in evidence.”

Around the world, police cautions differ in language but follow the same format.

In the US, it is called Miranda warning, but also known as Miranda rights and is a right to silence. [3]

You have the right to remain silent and refuse to answer questions. Anything you say may be used against you in a court of law. You have the right to consult an attorney before speaking to the police and to have an attorney present during questioning now or in the future. If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you before any questioning if you wish. If you decide to answer questions now without an attorney present, you will still have the right to stop answering at any time until you talk to an attorney. Knowing and understanding your rights as I have explained them to you, are you willing to answer my questions without an attorney present?

In Australia, the caution differs slightly from state to state:

New South Wales – You are not obliged to say or do anything unless you wish to do so, but whatever you say or do may be used in evidence. Do you understand?

Queensland – Before I ask you any questions I must tell you that you have the right to remain silent. This means you do not have to say anything, answer any question or make any statement unless you wish to do so. However, if you do say something or make a statement, it may later be used as evidence. Do you understand?

In New Zealand, the caution follows the same lines:

You have the right to remain silent. You do not have to make any statement. Anything you say will be recorded and may be given in evidence in court. You have the right to speak with a lawyer without delay and in private before deciding to answer any questions. Police have a list of lawyers you may speak to for free.

These examples of police cautions were taken from Wikipedia – click here for more examples from around the world.

PACE

In 1984, the Police and Criminal Evidence (PACE) Act came into being, with the purpose of regulating police powers and protecting pubic rights.[4]

Additional codes of practice have been published and updated since 1984 to provide specific guidance around :

  • Code C from May 2014 – Requirements for the detention, treatment and questioning of suspects not related to terrorism in police custody.
  • Code E, first published in January 2016 – Audio recording of interviews with suspects in the police station.

Code C lays out when cautions should be given, the terms of the caution as well as specifics around the cautioning of juveniles and the mentally vulnerable. It also gives guidance on general interviews, those in police stations and interviews of juveniles and the mentally vulnerable.

Code E explains how audio recordings should be conducted at each stage of the interview.

Evidence and Its Uses

Evidence that has been recorded enables the prosecutor to make a decision informed by what was said at interview.

It is also entered as an exhibit to the officer’s statement, and may be used in the same way as physical evidence.

Should the recording be entered and accepted into evidence, it will be used for the conduct of the case, when it has been accepted by the defence.

There is no requirement to prepare a record of the interview if the person who was questioned about and/or charged with an offence nor when the person stays silent or only says ‘no comment’ throughout the interview.

Transcription of Evidence

If the recorded interview is accepted as evidence, it can be played or transcribed.[5] Should there be a need for the interview to be transcribed, there are guidelines that should be followed, outlined in PACE Code E Note 5A. [6]

5A Any written record of an audibly recorded interview should be made in accordance with national guidelines approved by the Secretary of State, and with regard to the advice contained in the Manual of Guidance for the preparation, processing and submission of prosecution files.

Fingertips Typing Services can transcribe your police interviews.

Written by: Debbie Rowe, Transcriber for Fingertips Typing Services.

Visit Fingertips Typing Services.

Resources:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Police_caution
  2. https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/250902/crimestats.pdf
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miranda_warning
  4. https://www.gov.uk/guidance/police-and-criminal-evidence-act-1984-pace-codes-of-practice
  5. http://www.cps.gov.uk/legal/s_to_u/tape_recorded_interviews/
  6. https://www.justice.gov.uk/courts/procedure-rules/criminal/docs/crim-practice-directions-V-evidence-2014.pdf