Transcription and Confidentiality

Definition of confidentiality

confidentiality
What is confidential data?

Any data that contains personal, sensitive or confidential information. This data might include, but not limited to:

  • Medical record, be that doctor, dentist, hospital, optometrist, any healthcare provider
  • Police records
  • School/education records
  • Government held information, such as driving licence or passport
  • Information held by social services
  • Legal proceedings or information held by a lawyer
  • Property dealings, including lettings or sales
  • Personnel/HR data, including contracts, grievances or disciplinaries

Legislation

DPA 8
8 Principles of the Data Protection Act

The Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA) is an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland which defines UK law on the processing of data on identifiable living people. It is the main piece of legislation that governs the protection of personal data in the UK. The Data Protection Act (DPA) is designed to protect personal data stored on electronically.

It requires that organisations must ensure the protection of personal information, that might include name, address, date of birth, bank details. There is stronger legal protection for more sensitive information, such as:

  • ethnic background
  • political opinions
  • religious beliefs
  • health
  • sexual health
  • criminal records

Any organisation with access to personal data has a legal responsibility to adhere to DPA.

The individual whose personal data is being held is known as the data subject.

The individual who is identified as being responsible for the security of the personal data is known as the data controller.

The Information Commissioners Office (ICO) is responsible of overseeing and ensuring the DPA is followed.

Fingertips typing Services Limited Ltd is registered under the Data Protection Act acts in accordance with all the regulations set out by the ICO.

Ensuring confidentiality

Files are uploaded onto our web folders server.

Clients have a dedicated folder for their company. They can log in using a user name  and password provided by Fingertips. The client uploads their file into their Dictations To Do folder. There can be sub-folders in this folder, depending on urgency e.g. 4 hour, same day, overnight etc.

The system notifies the director that a new file is ready. Only the director and administrator has access to all folders. The manager will then transfer the file into the file that is specifically for typists. Typists only have access to that specific folder.

Once the transcription is complete, the manager will move it from the Typists folder to the client’s Transcriptions Done folder. The client can easily check the progress or completion of their files.

Clients can also send their files by YouSendIt (now called Hightail) and SendThisFile securely.

There is a strict non-disclosure policy provided by Fingertips Typing, which is adhered to by the typists.

Choosing Fingertips Typing

Fingertips has been established for over a decade, since director, Cathy Bennett, started the business. Our reputation is built on quality and trust – our transcribers are highly trained typists with experience in many different industries.

We’ve prepared this Privacy Statement to make specific reassurances that your information is kept confidential. This document will run through the different kinds of information collected and stored by Fingertips and explain what we will use it for.

Privacy Statement

Your personal details

To register for an account with Fingertips, you are required to supply your company name, your name, address, telephone number, email address and web address if applicable. This information will be used for invoicing purposes, as well as being added to the Fingertips customer database. The telephone number is used to contact the client in the event of unpaid invoices and any other work related reason that may occur.

Fingertips will not pass your personal details on to any third party.

Who can access my information?

The sub-contractors of Fingertips do not have access to the database and therefore to your information. Only the Director of Fingertips has access to the database, and the administrator who updates the database.

Visit our website for more information.

Written by Debbie Rowe, Transcriber for Fingertips Typing

 

Advertisements

Transcription and Typing

First Typewriter

first typewriter

The first typewriter recognised as being “commercially successful” is one invented in 1868 by Christopher Latham Sholes, Carlos Glidden and Samuel W. Soule in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. [1]

The patent was sold for $12,000 to a company called Densmore and Yost, who tried to manufacture the machine. The company made an agreement with E. Remington and Sons to produce the machine.  In 1874,  the Sholes and Glidden Type-Writer went on sale. It had a QWERTY keyboard, and was a blind writer, as the keys struck upwards. It meant that the typist couldn’t see the characters as they were being typed. [2]

Learning to Type

Children these days learn the keyboard very quickly without ever having a typing lesson. Because they navigate the keyboard using one hand or just two fingers, does that make it wrong because they are not using the tried and tested methods?

Learning to type, in the traditional way, is about learning which fingers type which letters, lots of repetition, and then the development of typing by touch or touch typing, by muscle memory. It was believed that this was the most efficient way of typing. Once the individual has mastered touch typing, the development of speed is crucial.

Children today can learn to type by games that teach them whilst having fun. It becomes second nature very quickly as they are using mobile devices with keyboards from a very young age.

Typing speeds used to be the benchmark, along with accuracy, for administrative jobs. The job adverts used to state how many words per minute the individual needed to be able to type in order to be considered for the job. A typing test, at interview, was standard to check speed. Check your typing speed here.

edu_seating
Image courtesy of  ratatype.com/learn

 

Here are some best practice pointers for safe and efficient typing. You can view the web page here for full details.

Posture – sit straight, elbows at right angles, face the screen with head tilted slightly forward

Home keys – ensure you always return your fingers to the home keys between typing bouts

Take a break – ensure you take regular breaks, to rest your eyes and your hands, wrists and shoulders

 

Evolution of the Typewriter

Since the invention of the typewriter, the keyboard, as it has become known, has evolved hugely.

mytype-timeline-full
Click on the Timeline to learn more

The concept of the modern keyboard has also changed, with the invention of mobile technology.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Typing Then and Now

When I learned to type, it was on the old fashioned manual keyboards, in a cold hut, whilst at sixth form college. Having mastered the basics, I then progressed to an electronic word processor that took on another learning journey. The keyboard was more reactive and faster, the keys required less pressure and what had been manual calculations before for tabs or centering were now a more automated process.

USB typwriter
USB Typewriter?

Typewriters and word processors gave way to computers, with small screens, small memory capacity and large keyboards. As technology progressed, screens got larger and so did the memory, and keyboards became more streamlined.

Eventually, the computers got smaller in physical size, massive in capacity and screen and keyboard condensed into one device. Typing can still be done manually on touchscreen with fingers or a stylus. But you can now dictate to your device and it is clever enough to recognise what it is you want to say.
The documentation produced has also changed. Letters used to be the only

hawking
Stephen Hawking

way to communicate, and these were typewritten or handwritten. Emails became another way to stay in touch, followed by text messaging.

Social media followed, allowing words to reach their recipient in a flash.

Technology exists to allow a user with a disability to type by having their eye movements tracked on a keyboard… Stephen Hawking.

The future is here – you can now buy a virtual keyboard, which a small bluetooth device projects on to a flat surface, offering the user a full keyboard experience. [3]

Virtual Keyboard.jpg
Virtual Keyboard

Whatever next?

Transcription and Typing

Whatever you  need typing, Fingertips Typing Services can help. We have years of experience of typing and transcribing a variety of projects, for example, but not limited to:

  • Interviews/focus groups/seminar/conferences
  • Medical reports
  • Property/lettings/estate agents reports
  • Legal/insurance reports
  • Education/dissertation/theses

Visit the Fingertips Typing website to see how we can help you work effectively, by providing a friendly, professional and personal service.

Written by: Debbie Rowe, typist for Fingertips Typing Services

Resources

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typewriter

[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sholes_and_Glidden_typewriter

[3] http://gandtnews4u.blogspot.com/2012/12/cube-laser-virtual-keyboard-future-of_75.html

Voting

Here in the UK, for some parts of the country, there is a vote to be cast on Thursday 5th May.

Voters in 41 police force areas in England & Wales, excluding London, will elect a Police and Crime Commissioner. [1] Turn out in the last PCC elections – in November 2012- was poor, at an average of 15.1%.

To find out more about the elections happening across the UK, visit the following links: [2] Continue reading Voting

May… we help?

Bank Holiday Monday – UK

This weekend sees the May Bank Holiday in the UK, a three day weekend, where historically banks and businesses would close.

Weather

It’s a running joke in the UK that, on the day that we have a day off work due to the bank

Weather Forecast May Bank Holiday
Courtesy of Weather.com

holiday, it rains.

The forecast, for the South East, at least, on Monday 2nd May, says cloudy, but not necessarily any rain.

 

Origins

The May Day holiday is the fourth of eight bank holidays in the UK.

British bank holidays are public holidays and have been recognised since 1871. [1]

The name Bank Holiday comes from the time when banks were shut and so no trading could take place. [1]

The first of May was the bank holiday, however, in modern times, it has moved to the first Monday in May, for convenience for schools and businesses, creating a long weekend.

Traditions

There are many traditions that surround the 1st of May, predominantly to do with the warmer weather and the onset of summer, after a long winter. The earliest celebration can be traced back 2000 years, where  Floralia, festival of Flora, the Roman goddess of flowers, was celebrated. [2]

Much of the May Day celebrations derive from the pagan Anglo-Saxon customs held during “Þrimilci-mōnaþ” as well as old Celtic traditions.

“The Old English name for the month of May means Month of Three Milkings.”

May Pole

In the past, people would cut down young trees and put them in the ground on the village green, tie ribbons to the top, and dance around to mark the arrival of the warm weather.

The dancers would weave in and out of each other, in opposite directions, effectively causing a plait-like effect with the ribbons. Maypoles were popular all over the country, and school children would practice for weeks before May Day to ensure they were able to remember the dance on the day.

May Queen

May Queens were, and still are,  human representations of the Roman goddess, Flora. A May Queen might be chosen from a group of young women, aged 13 and above, who had either performed a dance or similar, and would lead the procession.

Another tradition associated with the idea of choosing a May Queen, is the May Lifiting. On the first of May, in the old days, the young men of the village would choose the prettiest girl in the village and carry her around on their shoulders. On the second of May, the girl would choose a boy.

Morris Dancing

Morris dancing may have originated from several different places. The name Morris may be traced, possibly, back to a form of dancing that arrived in England with the arrival of the Moors from North Africa. Alternatively, the name of the dance may be so called because the dancers looked  Moor-ish, with their darker complexions. The dancers sometimes painted their faces black. [1]

Across England, the Morris dancers can be identified by their clothes. They are often dressed in white with coloured baldrics (coloured belts) across their chests. [1]

The formation of the Morris dance consists of either six or eight men, in two lines facing each other or in a circle. Part of their costume is white hankies or sticks, that they wave or shake. Some Morris dancers have bells tied to their knees to add to the music and their calls. [1]

1st May round the World

1297985112_industrial-workers-of-the-world.jpg

Around the world, the 1st of May is widely associated with commemorating the advancing of labour movements. It is known as Labour Day or International Worker’s Day.

In the US, in 1884, the American Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions demanded an eight-hour workday, to come in effect as of 1 May 1886. This resulted in the general strike and the Haymarket Riot of 1886, but eventually also in the official sanction of the eight-hour workday. [3] Labour Day, despite the auspicious date, is actually celebrated on the first Monday of September.

Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the Netherlands also celebrate Labour Day on different dates; though that has to do with how the holiday originated in those countries. [3]

May we help?

Fingertips Typing Services can help with your labours, even if you have to work on any of the UK bank holidays. Visit us to find out more.

 

Written by: Debbie Rowe – Typist for Fingertips Typing

Resources

[1] http://resources.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/bankholidays.html

[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/May_Day#Great_Britain

[3] http://www.officeholidays.com/countries/global/may_day.php

 

 

Transcription and Oral Histories

Is there a tradition or a story that has been handed down the generations in your family? It’s not written down anywhere,  just been told, from one person to another. There must be some truth in it somewhere but it’s been added to and embellished, blurred and reimagined through time.

This telling and retelling is as old as language itself. Since Man began to form words, stories are told to the young as warnings, as lessons, as bedtime tales. Before we could write, things were passed on verbally, and still it happens today. Indigenous tribes across the world have historically passed their knowledge and experiences along the familial lines through verbal accounts and rememberings. Continue reading Transcription and Oral Histories